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Personal Health Records save time, money and even lives.

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The Fat Factor: Higher Risk of Breast Cancer

Posted on 20 October 2014 Uncategorized

Being overweight or obese after menopause increases breast cancer risk.

Before menopause your ovaries produce most of your estrogen, and fat tissue produces a small amount of estrogen. After menopause (when the ovaries stop making estrogen), most of a woman's estrogen comes from fat tissue. Having more fat tissue after menopause can increase your chance of getting breast cancer by raising estrogen levels. Also, women who are overweight tend to have higher blood insulin levels. Higher insulin levels have also been linked to some cancers, including breast cancer.

But the connection between weight and breast cancer risk is complex. For example, the risk appears to be increased for women who gained weight as an adult but may not be increased among those who have been overweight since childhood. Also, excess fat in the waist area may affect risk more than the same amount of fat in the hips and thighs. Researchers believe that fat cells in various parts of the body have subtle differences that may explain this.

Also, breasts are made up of fatty tissue, fibrous tissue, and glandular tissue. Women with dense breasts on mammogram have a risk of breast cancer that is 1.2 to 2 times that of women with average breast density. Unfortunately, dense breast tissue can also make mammograms less accurate.

All in all a number of factors can affect breast density, such as age, menopausal status, certain medications (including menopausal hormone therapy), pregnancy, and genetics.

Be sure to register for our upcoming webinar for Breast Cancer Awareness on Wednesday, October 22nd at 12:30 p.m. (EST) for an in-depth look at breast cancer.

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Flu Season: A Spooktacular Sight!

Posted on 14 October 2014 Uncategorized

Here's a list of things you should never touch at work during flu season. Because the only scary thing this time of year should be your Halloween costume...(and the Walking Dead season premiere)

1. Phone

2. Desktop

3. Computer keyboard and mouse

4. Copy and fax machines

5. Elevator buttons

6. In the break room: Coffee pot handle, microwave buttons, sink area and table top

Want to further reduce your risk? Here's a few things to keep in mind: 

  • Wash you hands often with soap and warm water. After you finish washing, use a paper towel to turn off the faucet to avoid recontamination.
  • Use alcohol-based hand sanitizers often.
  • Don’t touch your nose, eyes or mouth with your fingers or hands, this just spreads the germs.
  • Get a flu shot.
  • Using disinfecting wipes on commonly shared items reduces the concentration of viruses by 99%.
  • Avoid handshaking and hugs.
  • Don’t skip meals.
  • Open a window, if you can. Fresh air won’t get rid of germs on surfaces but it will help if your office air is contaminated by mold or other toxins, which can provoke allergic reactions.
  • Most important, stay home if you are sick!

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Webinar: Breast Cancer Awareness

Posted on 14 October 2014 Uncategorized

For Breast Cancer Awareness Month, ADO is hosting a special webinar on the importance of breast cancer awareness with U.S. Medical Director, Dr. Howard Zahalsky.

Register today and join us at 12:30 p.m. (EST) on Wednesday, October 22nd for this very special presentation. 

 

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Breast Cancer Myth vs. Fact

Posted on 9 October 2014 Uncategorized

Myth: A mammogram can cause breast cancer to spread.
Fact: A mammogram, or x-ray of the breast, is key for early detection. It cannot cause cancer to spread. The risk of harm from this radiation exposure is extremely low. 

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1 in 8 Women and Breast Cancer: What Does it Mean?

Posted on 6 October 2014 Uncategorized

The 1 in 8 number we often hear is the risk of getting breast cancer during a woman’s lifetime. But it does not mean that 1 in every 8 women is diagnosed with breast cancer each year.

A breast cancer diagnosis is never good news, and thankfully most women will never get one. In fact, the National Cancer Institute estimates that if a group of 1,000 women were followed for 10 years from their 50th to their 60th birthdays, about 20 to 30 of them would be diagnosed with breast cancer by their 60th birthday. The other 970 to 980 women in this group would not develop breast cancer during these 10 years – although some of them might develop it later in life.

Age alone is a big factor in who develops breast cancer. Until women reach their thirties, the chance of being diagnosed with breast cancer is very low, and after that the risk begins to rise. The risk of breast cancer is at its highest when women are in their sixties and seventies. Women who begin menstruating later, have a first child at a younger age, or enter menopause earlier will tend to have a relatively lower risk of breast cancer.

The 1 in 8 number we often hear is the risk of getting 
breast cancer during a woman’s lifetime. But it does 
not mean that 1 in every 8 women is diagnosed with 
breast cancer each year. A breast cancer diagnosis 
is never good news, and thankfully most women 
will never get one. In fact, the National Cancer 
Institute estimates that if a group of 1,000 women 
were followed for 10 years from their 50th to their 
60th birthdays, about 20 to 30 of them would be 
diagnosed with breast cancer by their 60th birthday. 
The other 970 to 980 women in this group would 
not develop breast cancer during these 10 years – 
although some of them might develop it later in life. 
Age alone is a big factor in who develops breast 
cancer. Until women reach their thirties, the chance 
of being diagnosed with breast cancer is very low, 
and after that the risk begins to rise. The risk of 
breast cancer is at its highest when women are 
in their sixties and seventies. Women who begin 
menstruating later, have a first child at a younger 
age, or enter menopause earlier will tend to have 
a relatively lower risk of breast cancer. 

Read the full post »